The Whole Shebang

Ep: 10 - Abundance, Big Thinking and Creativity with Robin Voreis - Creating Your Future Self (Part 1 of 3)

December 06, 2023 Jen Briggs Season 1 Episode 10
The Whole Shebang
Ep: 10 - Abundance, Big Thinking and Creativity with Robin Voreis - Creating Your Future Self (Part 1 of 3)
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Our guest and my friend, the biggest thinker I know and real estate powerhouse Robin Voreis shares her fascinating journey of making moves around the country, the world,  and in her life.

Robin takes us through her punk rock upbringing, recounting how the book "Ishmael" and her parents influenced her curious and hopeful worldview. She shares her insights on personal growth and reveals the importance of constantly striving to be the best version of oneself.

As we wind up our conversation, Robin enlightens us on the power of abundance and calculated risk-taking which has allowed her to build a strong real estate investment portfolio with lots of great insight on how to do that successfully.

Tune in for an episode brimming with magic from Robin Voris on expanding boundaries, nurturing a mindset of abundance, and realizing the power of asking the right questions.

Contact Robin
Email: robin@robinvoreisrealestate.com
Instagram: @robinvoreis

We'd love a "follow" on the podcast, and a 5-Star Review is especially powerful!





Speaker 1:

Robin, what does it mean to think big? And I would say it's about casting a vision and having an idea that is outside your understanding of how, you can't quickly put a how to it, but that it's there and it's so. It's outside of your natural capacities. So by thinking outside of what I currently can, how I create capacity for new, how. Hmm. Like it. Just, it is the thing that creates the ability to do more or different.

Speaker 3:

Hello, it's me, your host, jen, and fellow journeyer on this path of learning how to reintegrate feminine energy into the boardroom. So we'll talk about things like conscious capitalism and leading with vulnerability and awareness and connection and play. We'll be diving into the bedroom. So basically, we're going to talk about the horizontal bombo and all seriousness. We're going to look at how to create a deeper level of intimacy and connection in your romantic partnerships, but also in all of our relationships. I think we've become so disconnected, so how do we gain that in our relationships? And then we're going to look beyond that into any tool or practice that helps us become more magnetic and more full. So manifestation techniques, meditation, um and personal development approaches that will help us move through challenges to step into our brightest, fullest, most magnetic version of ourselves. It's all the things. It is the whole shebang. So buckle up buttercups. We're diving in Oof you guys.

Speaker 3:

This episode is so rich and also could not be publishing at a better time, as you're setting goals and intentions for the year ahead, this is going to tee you up perfectly. It's going to be a part of our mini series on how to dream big, how to set goals and create a vision and a plan for the year ahead. So, um, I listened back to this. I messaged our guest, robin Voris, right away and said Holy smokes, there's so much in here.

Speaker 3:

We touch on what it means to think and dream big. Uh, what to cultivate within yourself so that you can think that way and achieve the dreams that you have. We hear about Robin's journey in real estate built, building an investment portfolio, and what that took. Um, she talks about what it means to know that you've only got one life and how to make it the one that you really desire. She shares a few very practical exercises you can do if you're stuck thinking small or maybe in a place of distrust, and we talk about how the questions that you ask shape the quality of your life. There is even more than that. You're going to love it. You might want to listen twice. You might want to take some notes. I hope you enjoy Robin.

Speaker 1:

Welcome. Thank you, I'm so honored to be here. I'm really excited.

Speaker 3:

Yeah. So for the listeners, Robin is, you got a little bit of an intro to her from me previously here, but I just want to share a little bit of my experience of you, Robin, if that's okay with you. Yeah, Um, so I met you, Robin, when I got at to Keller Williams. Yeah, and if anybody can see this video, like, go on my Instagram and see a clip of how Robin is dressed and it is amazing. It is not. It doesn't define who you are.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, and when I got to the office and saw you, I was like who is she and what is she about? And your energy is so magnetic, it's electric and and you have been known from the day that I met you and then from everything everybody has said about you is like Robin is the biggest thinker. I know she is like wild in the way she thinks. And actually you came up yesterday. So Jake is the owner of of multiple organizations that we have yeah, and you came up and he was like you know, this was before you came up. He said you know, what drives me crazy is when people just say I'm just going to put it out into the universe and see what happens, but they don't have a strategic plan behind it. And I looked at him I said, except for Robin, he's like a thousand percent. Robin gets a pass on that because she has made so much happen.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, so the universe and I yeah, we're good buddies, You're good. I was just going to say you're good pals, yeah, okay, so I.

Speaker 3:

there are a million things we could talk about but, specifically because I feel like that what's that's what stands out most to me. I would love to talk today about kind of your take on big thinking and creativity and abundance, and I know you've influenced me in this and are continuing to do so. So, but before we dive into that, give me a little bit about your upbringing and your childhood Cause I again I think we talked with other friends on this show it helps us have context for you.

Speaker 1:

Sure, I think something that really dramatically informed who I am is where I grew up. I grew up in Los Angeles, and it's an entire community, very large one, that is formulated on dreams. There's no water there. There is nothing about LA that is sustainable or natural. It is fundamentally a dream and everyone that comes there is a dreamer and, and so it's the sort of you know. I mean I grew up going to art museums and going to live concerts and just doing LA and there's so much possibility there that I think that, just like as part of the ether, did not grow up wealthy. When I was young, we lived in a one bedroom apartment and my bed was in the living room right next to the record player. That was it. It was like my bed and the couch in the living room. So I grew up in LA and, yeah, was in leadership in high school, but also wasn't a punk rock. It was a fun combination For sure, shaved my head for sure, did all sorts of things.

Speaker 3:

I don't know this about you.

Speaker 1:

There's some really fabulous pictures of me with my nephew at the time and my hair is short. It's like an inch long and spiky and fire engine red with this little one year old boy. He's like completely terrified staring at me.

Speaker 3:

We're going to have to get these and share them. Can we share this? Yeah, we can share that picture.

Speaker 1:

It's really it's like classic Robin. So I had this, I think, really unusual dichotomy growing up of like raising a fist to all. That is like this real punk rock notion of like the way that things are in the big world Like that kind of sucks, and I had this anger with that and kind of a chip on my shoulder I'd say about like I'm not doing it that way.

Speaker 3:

What do you mean by the way that things are? What is that way to you?

Speaker 1:

Oh man, there are so many ways, so many ways. Let me count your ways. Yeah, so I think at that point a lot of it had to do with capitalism and the machine that we're in, and it had to do with politics, and it had to do with inequality and homelessness. And I mean, I pick a place. When you look around as a big culture, there are there's lots of good, and if you look for it, you'll find it, but there are lots of places where our culture and our systems are failing us, and I was so angry about that when I was young.

Speaker 3:

Young like high school yeah.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, and I read. I read a book that turned that anger into curiosity. I think about, like it was called, Ishmael by Daniel Quinn, and for those of you that haven't read it, you have to get over the fact that it's about a telepathic gorilla.

Speaker 3:

Just a little hurdle to get over.

Speaker 1:

So if you, if you can get over how the story is told, basically it had the idea that before you know the laws of aerodynamics, you cannot fly. But there are laws of aerodynamics and we can fly. And basically the concept was that like we can build a civilization that flies, we just have to build it in congruency with the laws that govern culture and society and all of that, and so that felt really like hopeful. Wow, yeah, that like we can build a civilization that flies. And so that took my anger and it just, like it, made it less angry.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, you read that in high school. Yeah, how transformative.

Speaker 1:

It was for sure, it was my junior year of high school, and I was like I just the feelings of injustice and inequity and the things I was angry about didn't go away, but it diffused my. I didn't have to carry around the anger anymore, I could bring around hope and it was much more powerful.

Speaker 3:

Hmm, do you think that that pivot point was like a catalyst for you for the way you think I mean, you said it was just kind of in the ether but also this to me I'm really fascinated right now Because I'm like, oh, this feels like it makes sense to me that you had that pivotal moment and that that became of like, oh well, we can make anything out of anything. So I have these challenges and these problems, but I know that we can fly. We can live in a society that flies. Would you say that that was a catalyst for the biggest thinking that you're doing?

Speaker 1:

now I would say there's probably a seed of it in there for sure.

Speaker 1:

And I think it was also two other things of being like little Robin were the stories that I was told right One is, every single day, when I left the house, my dad would say be the best you can be. That was his expectation, and that is a growth mindset if ever there was. I mean, you don't reach the end of being the best you can be. So that's a question I still ask myself like is this the best I can do? Am I showing up as my best self? And so that has been a very powerful question to continue to wrestle with. And the other thing is my mom would just be like you can actually do anything you want. And so with those two things, I was like well, I can do anything I want, but is this the best I can be? Like, well, let's see if we can get better. And then I think the Ishmael book for me, I think, was a point at which I could do that with the world I could co-create, instead of just having it be in my head.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, One of the things that I appreciate about you is that you are asking the question is this the best that I can be? But it is without. I don't know how to put this to words. It's without like materialism and competition and just like and you've done really well for yourself and you've a quote unquote achieved a lot, but it isn't for the sake of achievement, right? So when you're asking like, is this the best I can be? It feels untethered from like weight, it feels right yeah.

Speaker 1:

Is that right? Yeah, it's truly a question of like, an inner integrity. Like is this? It Is this how I, is this the best I can show?

Speaker 3:

up. How do you define the best Well?

Speaker 1:

yeah, that's the point. Yeah, that's the question. That's a moving target. I mean, you get to what you think is the best and you see a new horizon and you're like, well, maybe what if that's the best? I mean, I don't, I have no idea what the best is.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, because I feel like, from outside, looking in, I would sort of presume that there's an element for you like adventure and freedom is the best, or like living from I don't know how to put words to this like living from the inside out, living with joy, like abundance, all of that. But I can see, even in the relatively short period of time we've known each other, how there's probably been an evolution to that.

Speaker 1:

A lot has changed 100% yeah, 100% yeah.

Speaker 3:

Okay, so let me hear from you what big thinking looks like to you. What does it mean Like what is somebody's like? Robin? What does it mean to think big?

Speaker 1:

Yeah. So I think, if I'm gonna answer that, I would say it's about casting a vision and having an idea that is outside your understanding of how. You can't quickly put a how to it. It's outside of your own understanding of how, but that it's there and it's so. It's outside of your natural capacities, because I think if you have capacity to do something, you could figure out how, and so, for me, big thinking has to be an idea that is outside of your capacity to know how to do something.

Speaker 3:

What's important to you about thinking that way? Yeah?

Speaker 1:

For me it's an expander. So I like to think about the analogy, because I did not. I grew up in Southern California, I did not grow up with the cold right, and I think about this every fall. So in fall, when it's 40 degrees, I'm so cold, I am like you know, we're coming off of summer and I'm wearing down jackets and scarfs and hats and I am freezing at 40 degrees. And then we have the expansive winter and it expands our capacities. When we get to a week where it's not above 10, or a week where it's not above minus 10, right In spring, 40 degrees feels free and warm and I've got no gloves and no hat and barely a shirt, I mean I am like warm and so for me, going to that extreme increases my capacity. So by thinking outside of what I currently can, how, by thinking outside of that, I create capacity for new, how, Like it? Just it is the thing that creates the ability to do more or different. Yeah.

Speaker 3:

I'm going to be like a four year old. Well, why is that important? Like you could just status quo it, yeah Right. Like you could just be like I'm good cause. I am good, but why expand your capacity? What's on the other side of that? Or like why is that important?

Speaker 1:

to you. The best version of me I don't know the best I can be is on the other side of that Right it all ties back to. That is like I don't know. Do you enjoy?

Speaker 3:

this what if we could?

Speaker 1:

Yeah, Like what, I don't know why not. Yeah. Yeah, oh, it totally lights me up, for sure, yeah, and for me it's about, you know. You say, why would that be important? Well, if I, I'll be honest, I get really bored with status quo. I also get bored, and thinking outside of my own capacity, I think, allows me to be really creative. Also. It's like another avenue for creativity which is not boring. Which is not boring.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, yeah.

Speaker 1:

Or prescriptive.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, okay, what are some of the things that you've manifested, birthed, created, what are some of the big things that you were like. I have no idea what the how is, and they have come to pass.

Speaker 1:

My whole current life. Well, and I'm like not actually meaning that, to be facetious. Like I and so a lot of the big things I've manifested. I like it or not, conscious or not, this is what I have manifested my current life, some of the bigger things that I think are probably worth saying out loud.

Speaker 1:

So a while ago I was like I wanna go somewhere for a long time, and so then we took my husband and I took our kids, who were at the time three and five, to India for a month and we just did that, which sounds even crazier now that my kids are not three and five. Like that was bananas, clark was still napping. We had to go back to the hotels for nap time. It was crazy. So that's one.

Speaker 3:

Can I pause you on that?

Speaker 3:

Cause we work together. I think one of the things that is remarkable to me you own your own business, you're in real estate, you have clients and I work with and coach a lot of people that can't put their phone down for a day. You know right, they're just like I don't trust anyone to deal with my clients because I'm the best and who else is there about me? Or, you know, whatever, they just whatever. They just don't have a plan. But the fact that you were like I'm gonna go on a trip and I don't know if this was, was this the trip that you were like I'm not answering my phone, I didn't know. Yeah, like how did you do that and how did you? What was your mindset around it?

Speaker 1:

That I, so far as I know, only get to be on this planet one time, and it's not just to work. Yeah, and I love what I do for work and I love who we serve and how we serve and I love everything about that. But I actually have, I have a wooden desk and I would carved or like wood burned into my desk Remember who you work for, and it's for me and my family. And so what is the point of having this really flexible career of the flexibility is only to work at nine o'clock every Wednesday night. So for me it's really about living my one, this is my shot to do this, and I'm only gonna have a three and a five year old one time.

Speaker 1:

So why not go to India? I don't know, it just feels like if I don't do that, then I wouldn't have done it. I mean that sounds so crazy, but that's my thought process is like so again, I only get this once and if I'm lucky, I get to hang out with my boys till they're 18 and maybe a little bit beyond that. But like this is short and it's fast and then I'm gonna die, and so I mean, like this is actually how I think, so why not actually like juice as much as I can out of life? And yeah, that's it.

Speaker 3:

That's why I love it and I'm tough, so with you on this, and what's looping in my brain is the voice of people that are like yeah, but what if you like? Lose clients and what if you do yeah?

Speaker 1:

Is that a reason not to live your authentic life Because a person might not wanna work with you? Like that to me. I hear it and I understand the logic, but I just cannot. I can't subscribe to that. Like say it louder for the people in the back. Like if somebody doesn't wanna work with me because I take time to be really present with my family, then they're not my client. Somebody else can have them. Like 100%.

Speaker 3:

This is so juicy and good. This is part of why you are magnetic, right. You are sending clear signals. You're vibrating really high and you're sending clear signals about where your boundary is and where it isn't, and you are willing to let go of things to gain things. You're creating oh, 100% Energetic space. You're creating space in every way that is allowing room for all of the right things to come in and the not right things to move out, Whether it's clients or energy or people, whatever, which is like so I love the way that you talk about it when you speak about it, because it's just like yeah, it's so matter of fact, but it also is so not common People just don't let go of that easily of things. I think most people are like yeah, but yeah, but I get it. But yeah, but she can do it, but I can't, and it's like it doesn't have to Nothing's precious.

Speaker 1:

I can let it all go.

Speaker 3:

Yeah.

Speaker 1:

Yeah.

Speaker 3:

Which is just wild, because I think when you are willing to let it all go, that's what it all comes in. Yeah.

Speaker 1:

It's fun, right? I love it. Yeah, okay, great, would I interrupt you you were on a path of, hmm, I don't know. I think we were talking about, like, what crazy things have? I manifested. A lot of it has to do with travel and adventure and my family we took during COVID. We took six months off and we pulled our kids out of school entirely and we homeschooled them and we lived in a travel trailer and that's cool. That was fun. That's so cool.

Speaker 1:

That was, yeah, that was awesome. We are living. The actual inside feeling of my house is manifested. We bought our house a while ago and for a long time I wanted to renovate it and so we did that and I had on my vision boards and in my writings like a playful, joyful, expansive house where, like, people come in and they feel delight and they feel comfortable and there's zero pretense, and when you walk into my house it feels like that.

Speaker 3:

We also are gonna need pictures of this for the socials that we can Like. Your bathroom wallpaper, oh, my bathroom wallpaper. It's delight and joy.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, it's the golden girls in pink and there's a lot of yeah. It is everything that we did. When we did that was for delight and joy, because that's what I had on the vision and my husband is the greatest sport.

Speaker 3:

He's like if you're delighted and full of joy, go for it. Yeah that's great, yeah, okay, I'm not gonna ask you what your bank account is, but I think it's.

Speaker 1:

I don't know the answer so I'm happy about that.

Speaker 3:

I don't pay close attention. Yeah, just let it come in. It just is accumulating. How old are you?

Speaker 1:

Can I ask you how old?

Speaker 3:

you are.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, 42. Yeah, I had to math, I'm 42. You're such a young, 42.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, thanks. Yeah, I don't know how to ask you the question, but I think it's really valuable for listeners to understand that, like, if you wanted to, you could retire today.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, yeah, I wouldn't have the same. I wouldn't be able to spend the way I currently do and I wouldn't be able to travel the way I currently do. But if we wanted to be really mindful of our spending, we could do it. How did you do that Intentionally?

Speaker 1:

Like you put a plan together, yeah well, I mean, that's for those that happens on accident. That's so awesome, cool. But we one of the things when we first got married as a couple is like we wanted to make sure that any money that we worked for turned around and started to work for us. Because, see appendix A, I like to play and I, again, love what I do and I'm deeply passionate about the work that I do. And it doesn't define me, it's not the complete sum of who I am and it's not why I'm on this planet, and so I have adventures to go on and things to learn, and that don't have to do with work. So it's always been really important to both my husband and I that our money works for us.

Speaker 3:

And so the vehicle for that is real estate, partially.

Speaker 1:

Yep, we've used real estate, so we bought our first property together. I actually came into our marriage with an investment property. That's a whole other story. I will just pinpoint it with like at one point it had feral cats living in it. That was my property. I owned that. So proud I own this property. I came to the marriage with that property and from then we bought a. Can I say shed whole? Yeah, you can. Can I say shed whole on the. Whatever this is, it's like the radio.

Speaker 3:

You can say that password if you want to.

Speaker 1:

So we bought what is effectively a shed whole in Colorado that we still own and his appreciated banana style right. So that's great. And then when we moved to Minnesota, we had options. When we moved here, it's like, okay, do we buy a house? Do we rent? Like, how are we gonna live here? We moved here from our time playing in the mountains and oh, psa played in the mountains. So we moved here in 2009 and at that point, you know, I remember looking at apartments and thinking about houses and we ended up living in my in-laws basement Thanks, rich and Marie Until we saved the money and, instead of buying a house, we bought a triplex and so our contribution to the monthly mortgage was like $400.

Speaker 1:

So now, instead of renting somewhere for whatever $1,200, we owned a property and we're paying. Our portion was $400. So that could accelerate our savings, that could do all sorts of things. And then I'm a real estate agent. I wasn't when we bought that, but then I got licensed and found this property and I told my client I was like this is a great house, you should buy it, and she didn't, so I bought it instead. And then, whoops, we moved. We have accidentally moved a few times that's my fault and have made money every time, and so then we started. I think it was after Greg was born, so maybe 2012, that we purchased our first investment property that we never lived in, and around 2012, my husband also got into full-time real estate investing, and so he is doing wholesaling and buying and renovating and either pulling it into our rental portfolio or reselling it or flipping it, but at a high level. So that's what he does full-time, and then, of course, that pairs well with what I do.

Speaker 3:

We could do like three whole hours on just that piece of it, which we're not gonna do, and I just wanna touch on well, I guess problem solving to me when you're talking about that, and even though I'm in the real estate industry and you and I have talked on a personal level about this, I still am very intimidated by the process of financing multiple properties and finding people. There's a lot that you need to problem solve for in this. I'm curious about the way your mind works, like you're thinking around obstacles and what it took you in terms of how you think about things in order to achieve all that you've achieved in that arena.

Speaker 1:

I'll say this For me, it all boils down to the worst case scenario Period. And actually just last night, aaron and I were running numbers and what's the worst case scenario? And am I okay with that? What could it get worse than that? Am I okay with that? And the numbers last night were like they could be. A home run might not be.

Speaker 1:

No, we just said fuck it, we bought it. I love that Because? So? For two reasons. Number one I think that both Aaron and I have a very high risk tolerance, but we also are really good at calculating risk. And a true investment shouldn't be risky. That's really good right. So if you're gonna buy something and it makes you money, there's really that's not particularly risky. So that's thing number one. And thing number two is I sat down with somebody early on in my career who worked with two multi-gazillionaires in New York City. He was a lawyer and he said that one of those multi-gazillionaires they both were multi-gazillionaires through real estate and that one of them, like paid attention to the penny and like would not overpay for a property and was very miserly about it, and like only wouldn't buy it unless he was correct on the price. And the other guy's, like yeah, I probably overpaid for half of my properties and they both are totally gazillionaires. So you know it'll work out.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, that's really. I love that because I'm from the outside sitting in. I'm like, well, which way do I wanna function in life? Do I wanna be miserly and looking at every detail? And maybe some people enjoy that and really, because if they're, twirled that way Totally.

Speaker 3:

For me I would not, and the idea of like, okay, if I can be risk tolerant and do my due diligence and then just make a decision and live with freedom instead of worry, that feels really great. Thank you for going down that path with me, because I think when we talk about really big concepts and big thinking and abundance, we're gonna dive into that in a second here. I've seen behind the scenes how smart you are. You're very intelligent and very strategic and very good at solving problems, and my perception of your take on that is it's not like Pollyanna positivity, but it's just this kind of grounded positivity. That's like what you just said It'll all work out, we'll figure it out.

Speaker 1:

There's a way, because we're looking at the numbers, we understand them, and if the reason I can say that is because I'm fully comfortable with whatever the worst case scenario is, and then I make a decision, that I'm done, and then I don't have to worry about the worst case scenario because I'm already okay with it. So it takes the panic out of the decision making, it's like well, I've gone down the worst case scenario, you have clarity.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, that's great. Okay, I wanna dive into abundance with you. There are, you are one of very few people in my world that I feel like has a grasp on abundance. That's what those are. That's what I'm saying. Cool, you're like, what are you saying about me? Tell me more. No, I want you to tell me more. Yeah, just what is abundance to you? It's a very broad question. I know I could just take it where. Whatever comes up for you.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, For me it's a yes. I'm gonna be so new-age-y right now, but it's a yes from the universe, like can I have this? Yeah, what about this? Yeah, sure, right, and I haven't found something. And maybe can I have. It Isn't the right language. There's probably something more powerful, but really, like there hasn't been much that I've been like I'm gonna throw this crazy-ass thing out to the universe. That hasn't come back with that or something better Like I've got. And let me also caveat that I have been shut down so much Like I have been. There have been so many times where I've been like I want this and I'm just like no, but it's because it's funneling me to something even better, and that to me is the abundance instead of, and that can be financial, that can be in friends, in community, in myself, right, and yeah, all of that it's a yes.

Speaker 3:

Can you think of an example where you've been like shut down and then it's led you to something even better?

Speaker 1:

Yeah, how real.

Speaker 1:

Okay, we're just gonna go there, we're going real. So for the last, however long I've lived here, I have wanted to live in the mountains again and I've wanted to go back and I have felt that a huge part of who I am has been missing living here, and so that's been whatever math. It's been at least 12 years that I've had, 13 maybe, where I've had this feeling of like not being my full self, not being complete, and I'm really pining and aching, like physically aching for a place right and through deep, deep, deep conversation over years and years and years and years, I feel like I finally got a no and that no has led me to oh man, I'm gonna cry. It's led me to deeper community here. It's led me to new places in myself that I haven't ever explored. It's led me, it has expanded me that no and the mountains are still there I can go visit, like. So I don't lose that. I don't lose that connection, but I have gained a completely new perspective and experience of where I currently live with a hard no.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, thank you for going there.

Speaker 1:

That was 13 years of hard work in two minutes.

Speaker 3:

I got. I like I could ask so many questions. We'll just, we'll just let it be there, okay so abundance is a yes and it's a no. Oh yeah, you're right, it's totally that. Yeah, yeah, yeah. So what else? How do you cultivate? How have you cultivated, whether it's a faith in that yes and the no, or like what have you cultivated in order to live an abundant life? Because you've manifested an abundant life, a beautiful family, the things that you desire in life? What have you had to cultivate or chosen to cultivate?

Speaker 1:

I think it is just a deep, gut level trust that in myself and in the whole, in all the things right, that, like I trust the no is good for me. I trust that I'm not. I am not asking for this universe and if it happened, if my whole, if my husband and my kids were safe and the whole rest of my life and everything financially burnt to the ground, I'd be okay, like I just don't. I trust myself and my capacity to build and my capacity to deal. It would be hard, it would be devastating and my gosh, I wonder. I'm not asking for it, but like I just trust it. So I think that's what I've cultivated is just a deep, deep trust, but also the habits of thinking outside of what I currently have. Right, because if I kept so, if I kept the big thinking that I had at the beginning of all of this, I would still be making $50,000 a year. That was a bananas number to me when I started, and so so you've continued to seek expansion.

Speaker 3:

You've just like evolved, evolved, evolved, like, okay, now the cheese moved. It's not about the goal post necessarily, but it's just about evolution and expansion. It seems to me more than anything else.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, so I would say I've cultivated deep trust and a habit of thinking beyond what I can understand.

Speaker 3:

Did the trust come? I don't mean this to be a leading question, because it kind of is. Maybe it kind of is when are we going with this question? Well, it's an assertion, maybe, of my own experience. I feel like for me, trust comes from experience of hindsight, looking back and going oh, I understand now that that was a no, because now I see what the bigger, better thing was. Or, you know, like for me, learning to follow my intuition, I've got to sort of test things kind of and see what comes back to me, see what the feedback is, and that's where trust shows up. It's like, oh, yeah, yep, that was intuition, that was the higher source, that was something. And so trust has developed over time. It's not as much, for me at least, as a like choice. I mean, it is a choice, you know, like I'm choosing to trust, but it also is based on something.

Speaker 1:

So I hear what you're saying and I feel like, if we want to base it on something, I've had lots of things in my history that I have been okay from. I've like survived, I have figured out, I have rebuilt, whatever. So there's plenty of data to support my trust, yep, and I also think it's as simple as why not trust it, like you choose every day to wake up and trust it or not. I also probably haven't looked for them, but probably have just as many stories that could point to where things didn't work out, and I could frame all of those past experiences in ways that would validate me not trusting. Yeah, right, like sure, yes, and I think there's a whole host of experience, but when it comes down to it, I really think you can flip on a switch and just decide and reframe. You can reframe everything that has happened and put it in the lens, look at it through the lens of trusting, and it will be fine.

Speaker 3:

Well, and when you do that, I think of course it's gonna inform the decisions you make moving forward. So if you look back at your whole history and reframe it from distrust, how locked up are you gonna be in terms of the decisions you're making? There's no way you would be here today if you were looking through life with that lens Totally.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, even right now, that like made me scared, like my body felt really constricted. Even just thinking about that, like if I looked at things through that lens I wouldn't be actively doing half the things I'm actively doing yeah, okay, that sounds so. That sounds scary to me. So I can imagine if there are folks out there that are look at their life through the lens of not trust, how it would, how what I'm doing would feel really scary. Yeah. But it doesn't feel scary when you actually trust.

Speaker 3:

Yeah.

Speaker 1:

I'm like scared of thinking about what it would feel like not trusting.

Speaker 3:

Yeah.

Speaker 1:

Like I feel that, like actually right here in my stomach. It's like stressing me out. Let's not think about it anymore.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, okay. So I wanna. You are a wealth of knowledge and experience in terms of really practical tools, I feel like too. So if people are listening today and like you had a day what did you call it Spark which was like a half day of exercises that you took people through, and well, maybe I'll just let you talk about it what it was, but what I wanna get at here is some tools for people that maybe haven't grown up, like you did, with a belief in possibility or an abundance mindset. If you were gonna coach somewhere right now that was feeling distrusting or had a scarcity mindset and they were like they were sitting right here, what would you say to them? Where would they start?

Speaker 1:

I'd start right here. I'd start right now. So I would and I have done this myself personally, so I do this actually I would get it a piece of paper and I would write down what your life looks like, current life, current life. Wake up. How do you feel when you wake up? How does your body feel? What bed are you in? Who's in your bed with you? What does the room look like? Are you getting up onto a pile of clothing? Are you getting it up onto a clean bed, like?

Speaker 3:

write an actual account of the current reality Very detailed, super detailed, the whole day.

Speaker 1:

The whole day and then put it aside and come back to it with a highlighter later that afternoon, tomorrow, a week from now, whatever. Come back to it when you're ready and highlight all the things you don't want. And then this is the part where I feel like, is the so? Like, okay, that's cool, I don't want to do that. I want my room to be clean and I want you know whatever you want. Okay. But the part that I think is the real magic is to figure out what stories are you telling yourself that support that life? So if you I mean this is coming from somebody who may or may not have woken up onto a pile of clothes for a decent number of years right, Like, the story that I'm telling myself is that, like, my clothes aren't nice enough to the uncons. You know, the thing beneath all of that is, like my clothes aren't worth taking care of. I'm too lazy to put them away. Right, Like those are things that were on repeat in my head, and so it's not just that you don't want those things.

Speaker 1:

You have to figure out what the actual stories are that are beneath that, and then just write stories you want, like I buy nice clothes so I take care of them and I enjoy doing it. The end Like so you're rewriting the story, yeah, but it's so. For me, this and I think this is really where the last few years have all kind of come to a head is that those stories are the stories we tell ourselves about who we are Right. And so if I don't want kind of half, you know half dozen things that are in my life, I'm gonna have to change fundamentally half dozen things about who I am, and then that is where the magic happens to me. So I like I have, as of recently, just like let go of multiple stories I've had for my whole life.

Speaker 3:

What was that question you said the other day? What are the stories that you have to let go in order to-.

Speaker 1:

To be the person you want to be. Yeah, yeah, like I. There's just a, I think, when you're thinking in a big, expansive way and you've got this crazy idea outside of your understanding so I'm sort of bringing it back to the big thinking If you have this big thinking crazy idea and you don't know how, that means that your current self, literally the box of who you are, cannot get to that crazy thing. So you have to put new things in the box and you have to expand the box and you have to, like, dump shit out of it, because there's not room for an infinite number of things?

Speaker 3:

Do you know that the box is an innuendo for a private part?

Speaker 1:

Oh well, now that I'm saying it, yeah, I have to put new things in the box. Yeah, I gotta try stuff out, anyway. So you have to let go of some of who you think you are to become who you could be.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, yeah, and I think the way that you described it earlier about highlighting things what do you wanna get rid of, what is the story you've been telling yourself and what is the new story I think to break it down that way is really important, because if I'm just looking at myself holistically and I'm like, well, what else do I need to change about myself if I'm gonna go there, it's hard to just A B objective and then see it from a big picture.

Speaker 1:

I feel like you have to break it down a little bit more, yeah, and the second part of that is highlight the things that you have, that you want, and what stories are those, and keep those.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, because awareness of that is really it's bringing, it's shining a light, I think, also just on subconsciousness, right On what's in your subconscious mind and how are we bringing that forward and making that more concrete? And the science behind that is the neural pathways. So if it's a story that I do want to keep, let's hardwire that in there, and if it's, one I don't, we're gonna rewire this. Yeah, yeah.

Speaker 3:

Okay, broad question Is there anything else that you would say to somebody that's living a small life right now, that advice or thoughts or things on your harder mind that you would want to speak to them?

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I would want to know how that is serving them, because it is in some way the playing small is serving something. It's supporting a narrative or an idea or a belief, like can you give examples? Yeah, so if you are making $30,000 a year, we'll just use money because it's a really measurable thing. That is an agreement that you are making to show up to a job every day to make that amount of money. And so how is that agreement serving you? Does it allow you to play a victim and shirk responsibility? Does it feed into the narrative that in order to be wealthy, you have to kind of be a bad person? You have to be sly in some way to make money, so does it keep you righteous? Are you a good person because of that? I would just want to know how is your current life serving you and are you okay with that moving forward?

Speaker 1:

And if they are, that's not a small life, but if they're not okay with it and they purposely have limiters on, but something in their heart feels bigger than that, then it's time to get uncomfortable and grow. That's so good.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, so insightful. Yeah. What's your next big dream? What are you dreaming up right now?

Speaker 1:

Like how many big dreams ahead would you have? A couple at least Okay.

Speaker 3:

So like a few things that I will throw out.

Speaker 1:

So our team is growing and in ways that I'm not going to say out loud yet, but they are already planned and the wheels are already in motion and it's really super exciting. So that's happening At some point. I want to spend a pretty decent chunk of time in South America, and so the conversations at the dinner table right now are like would we rather live in one place for a while and have the boys go to school and like dig into community, or would we rather just travel the whole time? Like I don't know Cool. So we're just like playing around with that idea. Other things on the horizon I mean I will say all of these and I'm both like, oh, that's going to happen, and I've said so many things that haven't happened, so like it might also not happen.

Speaker 1:

But other things on the horizon are like there's a book on the horizon. There's like actually two different books on the horizon. There's all sorts of nonsense. Yeah, it's not nonsense. Well, a lot of it, actually it is. It's a lot of me just dreaming up like what if I did that? I mean like that question of like why not? What if? Like I really just am like well, I don't know, it's so great. Why not Like? I love that question, why not?

Speaker 3:

Which, by the way, you are a queen of questions. Yeah, I collect them, thanks, yeah, yeah, you collect questions. Okay, tell people what that is, because I just think this is a part this is an important part of who you are. Yeah, okay.

Speaker 1:

So I think the quality of the questions that we ask will determine the quality of answers that we get. And so I have a question. Every time somebody asks a really powerful question, I write it down and I have a place where I store them all. And so I collect really great questions and when I feel stuck or confused or angsty or crunchy in some way, I literally go to my list of questions and I find the one that's worth answering, and then it always like loosens something up. Yeah, so it's, I can give it to you if you want it.

Speaker 3:

That'd be so great.

Speaker 1:

Yeah.

Speaker 3:

I think that that is obviously maybe it's obvious to me, I'm sure obvious to you you are. That is a part of your ability to expand, because you're investigating yourself, You're investigating the world. When you're asking questions that are high quality, that give you high quality answers, yeah, that is, I would assume, directly correlated to the abundance in your life.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, probably cause to some degree A lot of the answers are outside of my normal thinking. Yeah, yeah, yeah.

Speaker 3:

Totally so I'm going to ask you the question. I'm going to ask you two questions while we wrap up, okay. So the this is the one that you. You asked this to me. I was in the elevator at work and we didn't know each other very well and the question caught me so off guard. It's such a simple question, but you said what's the best thing? Oh, that's my favorite.

Speaker 3:

That's your favorite question, yeah, and I will say for me at the time I'm like, hey, no one has ever asked me that, but usually it's like how's your day? Or people just uh, that's a generalization. It's probably not fair. I think sometimes we focus on what's going wrong in the day, you know, like oh man, you know whatever, but for you it's just such a pattern interrupt to get the question yeah, and it's not even just like tell me something good that's happening in your life or tell me something good about your day for you to say like what's the best thing really makes you go, oh gosh, like what it? It makes you think differently, yeah, yeah. So what's the best thing for you right now?

Speaker 1:

Right now today, or just in general. In general, okay, um, I'm going to go with um, just really reveling in in the in the here being being here. Uh, is the uh turns out, I'm answering that that is the best thing is being here and having my life um be here and understanding what that looks like and the, the connection that I'm experiencing here.

Speaker 3:

That's currently the best thing, yeah, this question may turn up the same answer. I'm not certain, but the call that I just got off of there's a um, a neuroscience um, neuroscientist. He passed away from brain cancer a couple of years ago and he was a part of this community where they were really also focused on asking really great questions and at the end of his life he was still continuing to do his work and wanted to really leave a legacy and an impact on his boys and his, his wife and all of this stuff. But one of the questions that he continued to ask his self during that time when things got quickly snapped into perspective, was what matters most right now. So, yeah, what turns up for you with that question?

Speaker 1:

Um, my family, yeah, yeah, my husband and my boys, and, and whoa, I'm going to throw myself in that family too. I matter, yeah, all four of us. We matter the most, yeah.

Speaker 3:

Gosh, I love you. Yeah, thanks, um, okay, yeah, good, anything else you feel?

Speaker 1:

complete. I miss for now. Thank you for being here. Thanks for having me. This is a delight. You're a delight, thank you.

Meeting Robin and Her Magnetic Energy
The Book 'Ishmael' and Shifting from Anger to Curiosity
Defining Big Thinking and Casting a Vision
Expanding Capacity and Manifesting Dreams
How to Own a Business and Properly Detach
One Life to Live
Creating Energetic Space and Sending Clear Signals
Robin's Wealth Building Journey in Real Estate
Understanding Abundance and Trusting the Universe
Cultivating Deep Trust
Practical Tools for Breaking Small Thinking and Distrust
Rewriting The Stories We Tell Ourselves
The Power of Asking High-Quality Questions